It is important that you really define your needs when choosing a tent. A traditional Hilleberg tent is the toughest light weight tent there is when it comes to longevity and strength.
Our ultra-light tent series is impressively strong as well and very likely as robust as most other brands on the market. But in comparison with our model range in Kerlon 1800 and the real tough groundsheet it is not quite as strong and their life expentancy may be a little shorter. 
This goes actually for all ultra-light equipment today. These products are great for what they are supposed to do at a minimum of weight but they do not come up to the robustness with which more traditional equipment can boast.
So if your trips do not really demand the absolute lightest gear possible, a slightly more robust kit can be the better choice in the long term.
Ultra-light is the choice for those who need the lowest weight possible with great functionality but who accept reduced longevity compared with a slightly heavier tent.

Both models can be used in all 4 seasons. In some respects though the Nammatj is more suitable for use in winter and real tough conditions. The emphasis with the Nallo is on lowest weight possible with similar dimensions as the Nammatj.
The Nallo has an outer tent of ultra-light Kerlon 1200 and a slightly lighter groundsheet fabric. The Nammatj is made of our superior Kerlon 1800 and a heavy-duty groundsheet that is tougher still.
The Nammatj tents are equipped with superb and adjustable vents at both ends of the inner  and outer tent while the Nallo has a somewhat simpler solution where the one vent is integrated in the tent entrance.  At the foot end of the Nallo outer there are short guy lines which allow you to pull the outer off the ground creating an opening for air to circulate between inner and outer tent.
The Nammatj GT outer tent entrance has a no-see-um mesh panel which the Nallo GT does not have.
Nallo, as an ultra-light model, has a shorter pole at the back, lowering the tent there and saving weight; the higher pole at the entrance provides the most head room where it is needed most. The Nammatj has two poles that are equally long creating more volume in the inner tent.

One can always expect some condensation in a tent in certain conditions.
Some factors that lead to condensation are high humidity and or lack of wind outside the tent. Inside the tent we are dealing with moisture from our breath, the ground, and wet clothing.
Our double wall tents are designed to minimize condensation as much as possible. The breathable inner tent fabric lets air-born droplets of water out, like humidity from our breath or the ground. And at the same time it repels the large droplets from coming in; those coming from the condensation that can form on the inside of the outer tent.
In a smaller tent, you might feel like there is more condensation but it is really only closer to you.
We do our best to minimize condensation by choosing the best fabrics and giving vent placement careful consideration. You can read more on condensation in the Tent Information section. 

There is no tent around without any condensation. And condensation can have many different causes. (read more). Important is that condensation is kept away from the inner tent. The occurrence of it on the inside of the outer tent is quite normal and often inevitable.

A zipper in it self is never absolutely water proof, and you can experience some leakage during such circumstances. Most models do have a cover over the zippers to protect from rain.

We call the rain-fly the outer tent. What you see in the pictures is the outer tent, that being red or green.
One important feature that, in our opinion, distinguishes a true four-season tent is that the outer portion comes all the way to the ground around the entire perimeter of the tent. This helps keep out wind, rain, and snow.
On a Hilleberg tent, the outer and inner are hooked together and pitched simultaneously; saving time and keeping rain from reaching the inner tent. The outer can be pitched separately when you need a larger shelter or the inner can also be pitched separately in warm and dry conditions to keep the bugs away.

Since all of our tents can be used year-round, you need to be able to fully close the tent in severe weather.
Each time we add mesh we also have to add zippers and inner tent fabric to cover the mesh when needed. Otherwise, driving snow or rain can pack on to the mesh and melt through. Adding the necessary zippers will increase the weight.
This question illustrates the difficult balance between features and weight and deciding which is most necessary.

Yes, all of our tents consist of an inner tent of breathable water-repellant fabric that is attached to a waterproof outer. This design decreases condensation and increases insulation. They are pitched simultaneously giving a quicker, more integrated set up with the inner always protected from the rain from the moment you take it out of the bag until it is pitched.
From a safety standpoint, a double wall is advantageous because it will still protect you from the weather in the event that one of the layers becomes damaged.
A double wall tent with the inner attached with shock-cords and toggles also allows more flexibility since both the inner and outer can be used separately. 

There are many advantages with a double wall constructions.  A single wall tent is always more difficult to waterproof. There is also less safety in a single wall since a rip in the fabric exposes you directly to the elements. With a double wall construction there is always the inner tent protecting you even with a rip in the outer tent. 
A double wall construction also keeps the temperature up (insulation) and in most conditions it keeps protects the user better against condensation, also in comparison with tents with a single wall of  “breathable” fabric.
A double walled tent offers also more flexibility since inner and outer can be used separately! There may be situations where a single skin tent has its advantages though, but these are very few (f.ex. bivouacs at high levels). But even these are heavier than a double-walled Hilleberg tent.

A tunnel tent can at times indeed make more noise in very strong winds than certain dome tents. But the advantage in a tunnel is exactly this flexibility, not standing against the wind but giving in to strong gusts. With a flexible structure, wind cannot get hold of it. A side effect is of course that the fabric sometimes flaps. A dome tent with (quite often) more poles is more static and does not move as much but is not necessarily safer for that. There are different approaches in tent design, considering different behaviours in different conditions and in relation to weight and handling.

We use silicone coated (on both sides!) fabrics to obtain the highest tearstrength possible. These fabrics are highly superior to ordinary polyurethane coated fabrics but silicone coatings  do not provide the adhesion necessary for taping. We have consciously chosen to waive the possibility of taping to get the strongest fabrics possible!

We are limited by the width in which fabric is available.  In theory we could make tents with an inner width of 130 cm without any seams in the groundsheet but we would not be able to go up the sides all that high. Larger tents always have a seam. We have chosen a seam in the groundsheet so that we can create a proper tub floor.

It is impossible to determine the weight of a tent to the gramme: fabrics and coatings always differ slightly between pruduction runs. We control the weights of products from different runs and determine an average from those figures. We then monitor the weights continuously during the production year to make sure that they do not differ too much.
The stated weights in our catalogue are true weights. The minimum weight includes inner tent, outer tent and poles while packed weight refers to everything supplied, including tent, poles, stuff bags, pegs, spares, lines and instructions. Minimum weight does not really apply in practice but is frequently used in our industry as the only weight stated for tents. The difference between minimum weight and packed weight determines how well a tent is equipped!

We are supplying our tents packed in generously cut stuff bags. This facilitates packing away your tent when it is cold, wet and windy in the mountains. Consequently the packed size is somewhat bigger than it would be with a minimally sized stuffbag. All stuffbags are approximately 50 cm long and very roomy for your tent and its smaller stuffbags with poles and pegs. The length of the pole sections are 44 cm.

The following diameters are approximate sizes only:    

Akto, Unna, Atlas vestibuleapr. 17 cm Ø
Nallo 3, Nallo 2, Nallo 2 GT, Nallo 3 GT, Nallo 4, Nammatj 2, Nammatj 3,
Nammatj 2 GT, Jannu, Kaitum 2, Kaitum 2 GT, Soulo, Atlas inner tent
apr. 20 cm Ø
Nammatj 3 GT, Keron 3, Keron 4, Tarra,  Allak, Kaitum 3, Kaitum 3 GT,
Nallo 4 GT, Staika, Atlas groundsheet
apr. 23 cm Ø
Keron 3 GT, Keron 4 GT, Saivo, Atlas inner tent 6, Atlas inner tent 8, Altai apr. 25 cm Ø

These stuffbags can of course be compressed, but we do not offer any compression bags as an accessory. Strong compression can damage a tent and/or zippers.

One can pack the poles (a section is approx. 45 cm long) and pegs separately allowing the tent bag to be packed easier into a backpack.

Hilleberg tents generally have larger than average vestibules.
They are designed to accommodate at least the amount of gear for the number of people for which it is intended.
GT – models have an extended vestibule. Keron 4 GT's even have vestibules big enough to park two bicycles.
When using the tent on longer trips in the winter or when extra gear is required, we usually recommend going up one size in the tent or opting for a GT model for extra room.

We state length of the inner tent in the product descriptions in our catalogue and our web site. 
It is often better to choose a tent with two vertical inner tent entrances so you do not push the inner tent fabric against the outer so easily. 
If you are tall and use a tent with slanting walls at the foot end there is a risk of you pushing the inner tent fabric against possible condensation moisture on the inside of the outer tent. Consequently your sleeping bag may get a little damp. 
You could peg down the corners of the inner tent separately (there are two metal rings for that) when you have detached the shockcords between the inner and outer corners. When you then peg down the outer tent there is more distance between the two tent fabrics and you decrease the risk of pushing the inner against the outer.
Guy lines, or the adjustable peg loops at the foot end of the tent, should be pegged down in their farthest position for best venting effect and the largest distance between the fabrics.
To be on the safe side you could also drape a jacket over the foot end of your sleeping bag to protect it from moisture.

A footprint will increase the life of the floor and protect it from damage. However, it is not needed for the function of the tent. The groundsheet fabric is waterproof and puncture resistant.
Some people like to have footprints to keep mud off the tent or to cover the vestibule floor. Footprints help prevent dampness from the ground from condensating on the inside of the outer tent. We sell footprints that cover the entire underside of the tent including vestibules. They clip on to the rings, where the inner tent attaches to the outer tent, with toggles. The tent may be packed with the footprint tied on.
When returning from a trip make sure both pieces are fully dry before packing away.

Some of our tent models come with slightly pre-bent poles. These poles have a few sections that are pre-bent in order to reduce stress on the pole.

Customers often pick red to stand out or green to blend in. With our tents you have a choice of color for every model. Because the inner tent is yellow, there is no effect on mood between choosing red or green. The colors do not make a difference on temperature in the tent or the amount of light it lets through.

All the tents come complete with the necessary poles, standard pegs, and guy lines with line runners included. You also get a stuffbag, pole bag, peg bag, spare pole section with repair sleeve, and instructions.
Depending on the intended use, you may want to purchase additional or special use ground pegs. These you will find in the accessories – spare parts section on this website.

Some customers may also choose to buy footprints. Footprints cover the complete underside of tent including vestibules.
In the event that you would like to pitch the inner tent separately, you will need the separate pole holders: 2 for each pole. For example, an Akto requires two while a Nammatj requires four.

Check in the tent description to find out how many your tent requires.

We offer a lifetime guarantee on materials and workmanship. Excluded from this guarantee are damages from accidents, inappropriate handling or lack of care. Ordinary wear and effects from UV exposure are not covered. All repairs not covered by this warranty will be carried out promptly and at minimal cost. 

The materials used in a Hilleberg tent are of the highest quality, therefore they are also more expensive than many others.
Our exclusive Kerlon fabric has a tear-strength up to six times that of ordinary tent fabrics, and our groundsheet material was chosen because it is the most waterproof and puncture proof fabric we have found.
We have our own factory in Europe where one person makes each tent. You can even find their nametags inside the tent. We do not mass-produce anything. Each tent is assembled and checked before being sent out. We never compromise on quality or safety in order to achieve a lower price.

 

They are not absolutely necessary but they can be quite good to have. A footprint for the inner protects the groundsheet  from damage and prolongs its lifespan. Older groundsheets get extra protection against leakage.

A footprint in the vestibule protects you from moisture in the ground which keeps condensation at a lower level and protects your equipment against moisture. In a tent with two vestibules it may be a good idea to have a footprint in one of them and leave one without for muddy boots and /or wet equipment and clothing.

 

 

The best way to store a tent is to hang it in a dry and cool place, either loose or in its stuffbag. It is important to make sure that the tent is properly dry before it is being packed away. You dry your tent best and fastest if you can hang it somewhere with the poles inserted.

Before packing it away it should be cleaned and chacked for damage so that it can be fixed.  Ensure that the poles do not have any sharp edges at the ends which can damage the pole sleeves.

 

If you tent is dirty try and clean it with a wet cloth or sponge in luke-warm water or rinse it in a bath tub. Do not use any detergents and do not wash your tent in a washing machine!

 

The fabrics we use in our tents are waterproof because of a coating. Older and worn fabrics with reduced waterproofness can therefore not easily be “revived” to their original state. An impregnating treatment however will help the outer tent fabric to repel rainwater.

A worn groundsheet in an inner tent however can be replaced by us.  Take it to your retailer and they will send it on to us.

 

This is of course very much depending on what time of the year we get it sent to us. Taking into account the transport, you have to expect around two-three weeks. But during the summer months it can take 4 weeks. In July our service department is usually closed. Please get in touch with us before you send off your tent for professional care!

It´s important to keep the zippers clean, to prevent problems. If you camp in dusty and sandy environments, make sure to brush the zippers clean on a regular basis with a hard brush. 
Dirty zippers will wear the sliders down, and cause the zipper to malfunction. You may fix such problmes temporarily by pressing over the slider with a plier, but the zipper will have to be replaced sooner or later.

The inner tent is attached with toggles to the outer so they can easily be separated. Both the inner and the outer tent can be used separately: the inner as an insect-free shelter in a dry environment and the outer as a quick and simple shelter against the rain.

The easy adjustability ensures that poles can be easily inserted and stabilized. It is quite important that the pole holder is tensioned properly so that there is sufficient tension in the pole sleeve, giving stability to the tent.
The pole holder works even f.ex. if after having replaced a pole section in the field the pole is a little too long.

 

No, in most cases they are not since the outer tent of our models go all the way to the ground and also because one digs the tent down into the snow! Having the outer “seal” at ground level is a must for a tent to work well in winter conditions with driving snow and strong winds. With this prerequisite there is no need for snow valances. To stabilize a tent in snowy conditions, the use of appropriate snow pegs or dead men are the better solution.

However optional snow valances are available on order.

 

They are not absolutely necessary but they can be quite good to have. A footprint for the inner protects the groundsheet  from damage and prolongs its lifespan. Older groundsheets get extra protection against leakage.
A footprint in the vestibule protects you from moisture in the ground which keeps condensation at a lower level and protects your equipment against moisture. In a tent with two vestibules it may be a good idea to have a footprint in one of them and leave one without for muddy boots and /or wet equipment and clothing.

We do our best to be as accurate as possible when it comes to weight. Sometimes there can be slight differences. This is due to the nominal variations in weight that we get on the fabric. Not reflecting on the quality of the material, there can be small weight variations due to the coating. In order to give the closest possible weights for each model we take the average weight of ten tents. You can read more on weights in the Tent Information section.

The inner height of 40” is tall enough for most people to sit up. A tunnel design makes the most out of the height and volume available since you can use nearly all of that height. Many dome or geodesic tents only have a corner or peak as the stated highest point but the actual “useable” height is often lower.

 

We are supplying our tents packed in generously cut stuff bags. This facilitates packing away your tent when it is cold, wet and windy in the mountains. Consequently the packed size is somewhat bigger than it would be with a minimally sized stuffbag. All stuffbags are approximately 50 cm long and very roomy for your tent and its smaller stuffbags with poles and pegs. The length of the pole sections are 44 cm.

The following diameters are approximate sizes only:           

 

Akto, Unna, Atlas vestibuleapr. 17 cm Ø
Nallo 3, Nallo 2, Nallo 2 GT, Nallo 3 GT, Nallo 4, Nammatj 2, Nammatj 3, Nammatj 2 GT, Jannu, Kaitum 2, Kaitum 2 GT, Soulo, Atlas inner tent apr. 20 cm Ø
Nammatj 3 GT, Keron 3, Keron 4, Tarra,  Allak, Kaitum 3, Kaitum 3 GT,  Nallo 4 GT, Staika, Atlas groundsheetapr. 23 cm Ø
Keron 3 GT, Keron 4 GT, Saivo, Atlas inner tent 6, Atlas inner tent 8, Altaiapr. 25 cm Ø

 

These stuffbags can of course be compressed, but we do not offer any compression bags as an accessory. Strong compression can damage a tent and/or zippers.

One can pack the poles (a section is approx. 45 cm long) and pegs separately allowing the tent bag to be packed easier into a backpack.

Tent usage (11)

 

Make sure that the site is reasonably even, dry and free of sharp objects. Avoid hollows where rain water could collect in a sudden downpour. If possible find a place protected from the wind. When pitching you tent close to bodies of water you are increasing the risk for condensation.

Think of the environment. If you move any rocks make sure you put them back when you leave the site, and be cautious when making a fire.  

 

 

One has to be extremely cautious with a stove, actually any open flame inside a tent should be avoided! But you may still want to be able to prepare your food inside when the weather is less than hospitable. This can be done if you are really careful.

In the bigger tents, particularly the GT-models, a stove can be operated with reasonable safety margins. Be watchful with presure stoves that can be temperamental in the priming stage or shortly after with flaring flames that are difficult to control. Stoves burning methylated spirits have a habit of flaring as well when you take off the saucepan. With these stoves the flame is difficult to control and therefore a little risky.

It is still most desirable to keep your stove outside your tent when possible – for the sake of safety and to keep condensation inside as low as possible.

 

The shiny side goes up with the matte finish toward the ground.

Yes, the inner tent can be unhooked fully or partially and pulled to the side to make even more vestibule room.

Make sure the tent is pitched properly and is fully taught. The adjustable pole holders should be tightened so the outer tent meets the bottom of the pole holder.
All guy lines should be drawn to their full length and pegged down. The guy lines attached to the vents should also be secured.
In winter conditions, you may have the advantage of being able to dig down into the snow a bit before you pitch your tent. Never dig the tent down further than half its own height. Be weary that wind will bring more snow with it and can block entrances.

The back of the outer tent can be unzipped and rolled up to create a gap to allow more airflow. This can be achieved by pulling the peg at the middle of the rear end and pitch out the guy line located just above the zipper. You can also detach the back corners of the inner tent and peg these to the ground to enlarge the gap between the inner and outer even more. This can also be done on the Nammatj tents.
Additional airflow can be achieved when the door on the outer tent is zipped open a bit from the top under the protection of the vent.
The door on the inner tent can be zipped open and pulled to the side leaving the full protection of the mesh door.  

The three season tent Rogen leaves a ventilated air gap towards the ground all around the tent. It provides excellent ventilation and indoor climate that is often desirable during hot summer weather in three season tents. However, the tent gets colder in cold and windy weather conditions than tents without such generous ventilation. The open design with free air flow allows the wind and rain to cool the bathtub inner tent floor in a way that does not occur in conventional four season tents. It can lead to condensation, especially in the corners of the floor, which can sometimes be perceived as leakage.

 

We purposely do not give any wind speed ratings for the tents. Usually, a number that you see that indicating wind speed “rating” is the result of a test done in a wind tunnel, where the tent is bolted to the floor, the wind generator is turned on, and the maximum wind speed the tent withstands is measured. This is not a very accurate way of measuring what actually happens when you use the tent outdoors, since real wind can change direction and speed at any moment. More importantly, one of the first things that can happen in severe weather is that the pegs come out, or, even worse, that the tent can’t be set up at all. We use a wind machine, set up outdoors, to make sure that the tents all can be set up by one person in very hard wind: we turn the machine on and then start pitching the tent in the wind stream to ensure that it can be set up in severe wind. We also leave the tent pitched in the wind stream for 6 to 8 hours to ensure that it will withstand the wind for an extended period. In general, the working wind speed we use is between 25 and 30 meters per second (56 to 67 mph), but that is not necessarily the maximum speed.

Move the pegs at the base of the pole sleeves to the inside to keep the poles in place. NOTE: In extremely wet condition, you can detach the inner tent completely and store it in a separate bag before taking down the outer tent. At your next camp spot, set up the outer tent, then reattach the still-dry inner tent.